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2633 Lincoln Boulevard #204, Santa Monica, CA 90405

©2017 by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Westside Coalition. Proudly created with Wix.com

 
AMANDA GORMAN, U.S. YOUTH POET LAUREATE, WILL BE GUEST SPEAKER AT JAN. 20, 2020 EVENT

Called the 'next great figure of poetry in the US', at 19-years-old, Amanda Gorman is a published author and the first ever Youth Poet Laureate of the United States of America. 

She's spoken around the country from the UN to the Library of Congress, alongside the likes of Lin-Manuel Miranda and Hillary Clinton Her first poetry book, "The One For Whom Food Is Not Enough", was published in 2015 by Pemanship Books.  She is Founder and Executive Director of One Pen One Page, which promotes literacy through free creative writing programming for underserved youth. She is a Harvard junior in the top of her class, and writes for the New York Times student newsletter The Edit.

photo credit: Anna Zhang

I, Too

By Langston Hughes

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.

They send me to eat in the kitchen

When company comes,

But I laugh,

And eat well,

And grow strong.

Tomorrow, I’ll be at the table

When company comes.

Nobody’ll dare Say to me,

“Eat in the kitchen,"

Then.

Besides, They’ll see how beautiful I am

And be ashamed—

 
 
 

The History of Black History

 

by Elissa Haney

 

Americans have recognized black history annually since 1926, first as "Negro History Week" and later as "Black History Month." What you might not know is that black history had barely begun to be studied-or even documented-when the tradition originated. Although black people have been in America at least as far back as colonial times, it was not until the 20th century that they gained a respectable presence in the history books.

We owe the celebration of Black History Month, and more importantly, the study of black history, to Dr. Carter G. Woodson. Born to parents who were former slaves, he spent his childhood working in the Kentucky coal mines and enrolled in high school at age twenty. He graduated within two years and later went on to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. The scholar was disturbed to find in his studies that history books largely ignored the black American population-and when black people did figure into the picture, it was generally in ways that reflected the inferior social position they were assigned at the time.

Woodson, always one to act on his ambitions, decided to take on the challenge of writing black Americans into the nation's history. He established the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (now called the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History) in 1915, and a year later founded the widely respected Journal of Negro History. In 1926, he launched Negro History Week as an initiative to bring national attention to the contributions of black people throughout American history.

Woodson chose the second week of February for Negro History Week because it marks the birthdays of two men who greatly influenced the black American population, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. However, February has much more than Douglass and Lincoln to show for its significance in black American history.

Did You Know?

1619: The first slaves arrive in Virginia

Lucy Terry

Lucy Terry, an enslaved person in 1746, becomes the earliest known black American poet when she writes about the last American Indian attack on her village of Deerfield, Massachusetts. Her poem, Bar's Fight, is not published until 1855.

1773

Phillis Wheatley's book Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral is published, making her the first African American to do so.

1787

Slavery is made illegal in the Northwest Territory. The U.S Constitution states that Congress may not ban the slave trade until 1808.

Jackie Robinson's 100th birthday celebrated

MISSION

To educate adults and youth
To inspire community participation
To promote the ideals of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for understanding, knowledge and healing

Group photo MLK Outside WCC.jpg

STAND AGAINST INJUSTICE

"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."
--Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

AMAZON SMILE

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Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Westside Coalition

https://smile.amazon.com/ch/95-4380986

Inspiration

 

 

"I still have a dream that one day war will come to an end, that men will beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks, that nations will no longer rise up against nations, neither will they study war any more."

--Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 
 

VISION

 

CONTACT REV. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR WESTSIDE COALITION

2633 Lincoln Boulevard #204, Santa Monica, CA 90405

(818) 207-3934 

 

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